Courses

Day 1
02 May 2019

The relation between production and perception in sound change

Lecturer: Andries Coetzee

Starting Date: 02/05/2019
Ending Date: 04/05/2019

Places: 50

Existing theories about sound change focus either on the role of speakers or the role of listeners. However, members of a speech community are of course both speakers and listeners of their language. This course will investigate the relationship between the production and perception patterns of individual language users in ongoing sound changes. Questions such as the following will be considered: Do the production and perception patterns of an individual speaker change together, or does change in one modality precede that in the other modality? Are innovative speakers (those who drive a sound change) also necessarily innovative listeners? These issues will be explored based on recent research focusing on a variety of languages, including English, Afrikaans, Kera, different varieties of Chinese, etc. Participants will also be encouraged to draw on their own experiences to develop research projects related to this topic.

Theories and Practices of Second Language Phonetic Learning

Lecturer: Xinchun Wang

Starting Date: 02/05/2019
Ending Date: 04/05/2019

Places: 50

Learners of a second language (L2) often have difficulties in perception and production of the target language speech sounds and prosody. Despite these difficulties, training studies have shown that well-designed computer-based training is effective in improving learners’ perception and production of L2 speech. This course teaches the theories and practices of L2 phonetic learning. The course aims to help those who are interested in teaching L2 pronunciation, or, those want to improve their own L2 pronunciation. The course begins with a brief introduction to the current L2 phonetic learning theories, the Perceptual Assimilation Model (PAM) and the Speech Learning Model. These theories are discussed with empirical studies on cross-linguistic speech perception and production. Topics include factors that contribute to L2 phonetic learning problems, (e.g. age of learning, L2 experience, L1 background), and the goals of pronunciation teaching: improving intelligibility and comprehensibility. The course also focuses on the effect of different phonetic training on L2 speech learning. Phonetic training experiments with different training methods are discussed and compared for learning effectiveness. The mode of instruction includes lectures, class discussions, and hands on activities that provide opportunities for learners to learn speech data collection and analysis for research and practice purposes.

Grammar and the school 

Interpretação em LIBRAS

Lecturers: Tom Roeper, Marcus Maia & Eloisa Pilati

Starting Date: 02/05/2019
Ending Date: 04/05/2019

Places: 50

The minicourse will be composed of three three hour classes focusing on the interface between grammatical knowledge and education. Translation into Portuguese will be provided for Tom Roeper’s module.

(1) Linguistics, grammar and active learning, Eloisa Pilati (UnB): (a) A brief history of grammar teaching in Brazilian legislation (PCNs and BNCC); (b) Fundamental concepts of Active Learning and Generative Theory; (c) Case studies: grammatical patterns of Brazilian Portuguese.

(2) How Complex Grammar is the Core of Grammar and the School Curriculum. We can do recursion in English for adjectives on the left, but not in Spanish: the big, strange, funny, hats. So we need a rule to express this: and we can formulate it. Tom Roeper (UMass, Amherst). It can be both instructive and fun to talk about complex syntax. And it is the most revealing place to see the principles of grammar. There are four forms which reach to the heart of grammar: (a) Recursion; (b) long-distance rules. We have long-distance rules: what did John say Bill said Fred wanted; (c) quantification. And for quantification, it is the interaction of quantifiers that is revealing: Three boys saw every hat/ Every boy saw three hats. In the first it is the same three boys, but in the second it can be different hats; (d) ellipsis. And finally ellipsis shows that we keep sentences available and refer to them even if we do not say them and even if they are ambiguous: John liked Bill more than Susan. We will illustrate with experiments on children how these questions can be made alive for high school students and reveal basic properties of grammar.

(3) Thinking syntactically, experimentally and educationally, Marcus Maia (UFRJ/CNPq): The class will start by developing practical exercises with eye-tracking data on the reading of (a) Complex sentences with several levels of embedding vis à vis juxtaposed clauses; (b) The gist in the reading of complex sentences; (c) Temporarily ambiguous sentences. The eye-tracking technique will then be introduced as a metacognitive device to help trigger students’ science forming capacity and metalinguistic awareness, having the potential to improve their reading skills.

Linguistic change: social and cognitive process

Lecturer: Marcos Bagno

Starting Date: 02/05/2019
Ending Date: 04/05/2019

Places: 50

The phenomenon of language change served as the starting point for the construction of a linguistic science in the second half of the nineteenth century, totally dedicated to the study of diachronic processes, their causes and consequences. In fact, linguistic change is the raison d’être of nineteenth-century comparative philology, as it had also been in antiquity the main motive for the constitution of grammatical doctrine, designed to preserve the language of corruption, that is, of change. Even the schools of linguistic thought which have opposed the study of diachrony, such as classical structuralism and gerativism, make linguistic change its object by negation, which demonstrates its importance. Variationist sociolinguistics, starting in the 1970s, advanced the knowledge of the factors of change by relating them to the processes of social variation, advocating a panchronic view of the facts of language. More recently, advances in the cognitive sciences have helped to understand linguistic change as a result of language processing stemming from the cognitive capacities of the human species. The course recapitulates the history of these theories and methods to arrive at the definition of linguistic change as a phenomenon of a sociocognitive nature, in which the individual and the social interact incessantly. The course will be taught in Portuguese.

The Syntax of English: Theoretical Foundations and Descriptive Detail

Lecturer: Geoff Pullum

Starting Date: 02/05/2019
Ending Date: 04/05/2019

Places: 50

English is the most important language in the world, used every day by between one and two billion people and recognized officially for government purposes in some 60 countries. Instruction in English language is a massive worldwide business calling for accurate, accessible, and comprehensive descriptions of the language. Unfortunately the study of standard English grammar is in a terrible state. Textbooks promulgate myths, half-truths, confused definitions, bad analyses, and false generalizations that should have been abandoned at least 200 years ago. One major attempt to remedy this situation has been the production of The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (CGEL), co-authored by Rodney Huddleston and Geoff Pullum with the aid and collaboration of a dozen other linguists. It incorporates many insights that have been discovered over the past six decades of work in generative linguistics over the past six decades, without treating any one theory as sacrosanct. It respects earlier work on English grammar wherever possible, but breaks with both traditional and modern work (and the associated terminology) wherever it can be argued to be incoherent or misleading. Unusually, it attempts to be comprehensive, dealing with not just selected areas of theoretical significance but with the entire panoply of grammatical constructions seen in the structure of English sentences. This course introduces CGEL’s characteristic approaches and modes of analysis, keeping grammatical theory and its factual basis simultaneously in focus. It illustrates some of the ways in which CGEL’s description departs radically from widely held assumptions, and explains why. It also incorporates surveys of some rich and interesting sets of facts. The course is intended to be suitable for a wide variety of scholars, teachers, editors, writers, and others interested in the English language. It does not presuppose any advanced study of contemporary theoretical linguistics.

The origin of language: 60,000 generations of human language

Lecturer: Daniel Everett

Starting Date: 02/05/2019
Ending Date: 04/05/2019

Places: 50

How and when did human language begin? One common proposal is that the languages of our species appeared suddenly between 150,000 and 250,000 years ago. The evidence in favor of this hypothesis is relatively fragile, but it generally assumes that symbols originated with art while grammar emerged alongside more complex tool development of sapiens. According to this hypothesis, other species of our genus Homo, such as erectus and neanderthalensis, became extinct because they lacked language and, therefore, were unable to compete successfully with sapiens. In this couse, we will reexamine the archaeological evidence and via this evidence defend an alternative hypothesis, namely, that human language appeared gradually, at least 3 million years ago. The record begins with icons collected by Australopithecus africanus and proceeds to symbols, first appearing with Homo erectus, some 2 million years ago. We consider the evolution of the human brain, vocal apparatus, and human semiotics (from a Peircean perspective). We will define language as the transmission of information via triadic symbols (not dyadic symbols as in the Saussurian system) and conclude that Homo sapiens was born into a linguistic world. We will see that grammar emerged from symbols and not vice-versa. We will additionally conclude that grammar is merely a part (and not a major part at that) of human language, arising from the more important symbols. We will present a variety of examples from other species, such as bird song patterns, sign use by other great apes, and we will conclude that non-symbolic systems (as all non-human communication systems seem to be) have no direct relation to the evolution of human language. As we will finally learn, with the gradual appearance of language, based on the growth and development of cognition and culture in humans, it is superfluous to propose baroque proposals such as genetic linguistic mutations or any “universal grammar.” This course will be taught in Portuguese.

Semiotics and Rhetoric

Lecturer: José Luiz Fiorin

Starting Date: 02/05/2019
Ending Date: 04/05/2019

Places: 50

This course addresses the relations between Semiotics and Rhetoric. Since Antiquity, Rhetoric has been studying both the discourse construction of arguments, and the antiphonic discourse dimension. Semiotics must be thought of as the modern-day “heir” of Rhetoric, in the sense that it must read Rhetoric through the lenses of the new theoretical framework it has put forward. By inheriting Rhetoric, Semiotics sets as its objectives the description of the discourse procedures which enable the enunciator to produce the meaning effects which allow the enunciatee to believe what was said, as well as the analysis of the real characteristics of the argumentative work, namely the dialogic nature of argument construction. This course will be taught in Portuguese.

The “Wow” and the “How”: Understanding and training the prosodic essentials of successful presentations and negotiations in a cross-linguistic perspective

Lecturer: Oliver Niebuhr

Starting Date: 02/05/2019
Ending Date: 04/05/2019

Places: 50

Modern leadership and rhetoric workshops are already doing great things when it comes to the right use of words. Words are – as far as this is possible – clearly defined and easily understood elements in the speech signal and its underlying linguistic structure. Therefore, it is relatively simple to both teach and learn the right choice of words for good public speaking, especially since we know the meanings and the proper (context-/style-specific) pronunciation of words basically since our earliest childhood. But, what about the “How”, and the prosodic patterns of speech in particular? When it comes to successful presentations and negotiations, many scientific studies suggest that speech prosody is an even more important rhetorical instrument than the word. Nevertheless, in rhetoric, speech prosody has so far largely been represented and conceptualized by terms like “animated”, “fluent” etc. Terms like these can hardly be objectified, effectively and precisely trained and standardized across both learners and trainers, especially not in a cross-linguistic and cross-cultural perspective. Against this background, the offered 9h course gives its participants an overview of how successful presentations and negotiations can be translated into acoustic parameters and parameter settings of speech prosody. After a short introduction into basic principles of prosodic phonetics and phonology/typology (day 1), participants will learn in a hands-on case study (day 2) how speaker charisma can be assessed and analyzed (taking into account context, gender, and language factors), and they will practice how to become a more charismatic speaker themselves. The course is concluded by a further analogously structured hands-on case study (day 3) that focuses on the phenomenon of prosodic entrainment, its active training, and its role in successful negotiations.

Sign Language Typology: Patterns and Variation

Lecturer: Roland Pfau

Starting Date: 02/05/2019
Ending Date: 04/05/2019

Places: 50

Over the past 50 years, research in sign language linguistics has demonstrated that sign languages are fully-fledged natural languages with complex grammatical structure at all levels of linguistic description. In this course, we will take a typological perspective on selected aspects of the grammar and lexicon of sign languages. The following domains will be addressed: (i) Morphosyntax: the use of space for grammatical purposes; (ii) Syntax: the expression of sentential negation; (iii) Lexicon: semantic fields such as color terms and numerals. Data will be drawn from sign languages of diverse geographical origin, including so-called village (or rural) sign languages. Two types of typological comparison will be central to the discussion. On the one hand, we will compare sign language structures to those previously described for spoken languages (cross-modal comparison); on the other hand, sign languages will also be compared to each other (intra-modal comparison). The course does not assume a background in sign language linguistics. The structural properties relevant to the discussion will be introduced in each meeting.

Internal reconstruction and contact history: Recovering the linguistic past of South America

Lecturer: Willem Adelaar

Starting Date: 02/05/2019
Ending Date: 04/05/2019

Places: 50

This course deals with different non-quantitative approaches that can be used for the reconstruction of stages in the development of South American indigenous languages and language families pre-dating their initial documentation. A powerful means for the recovery of such early language stages and a method unsufficiently explored in historical research dedicated to South American languages is internal reconstruction, both at the lexical and at the morphological level. Reconstruction efforts can be expanded with a systematic search for the etymological background of lexical items and grammatical markers, a line of research which is rarely seen the study of most South American languages. A further field that can contribute to the reconstruction of language stages of the past is the study of language contact in a historical perspective. Combining contact history and internal reconstruction, thereby establishing a chronology of plausible events in the (pre)history of languages, makes it possible to reach particularly significant results, as in the case of the historical convergence of the great Andean language families Quechuan and Aymaran. At another level, the study of linguistic areas can function as a reliable means of recovering the geographical footprint left behind by languages before they reached their final destination. It can be useful in deciding whether or not a particularly language or language group has a history in an area at issue.

This course will be taught in Portuguese.

Gender, Race, Sexuality in Language Classrooms

Lecturer: Glenda Cristina Valim de Melo

Starting Date: 02/05/2019
Ending Date: 04/05/2019

Places: 50

Based on the high reflexivity assumptions, and that gender, race and sexuality have been debated by social and collective movements on the web, this course aims at discussing identity issues (race, gender and sexuality) in school context, specifically in language classes. For that, the theoretical support will emphasises (fe)male researchers contribution in the ​​Brazilian Applied Linguistics area. The content of the course deals with language as performance, performativity, discursive and performative conception of gender, race, sexuality, queer theories, the discursive effects on social practices and the perspective of language teaching as work. The methodology of this course involves reading some articles about the suggested content, presentation of contents and discussion of them with the participants, reflection on our teaching practices in the classroom considering the body markers mentioned. This course will be taught in Portuguese.

Language and identity in sociolinguistics: Theories, methods, innovations

Lecturer: Erez Levon

Starting Date: May 02, 2019
Ending Date: May 04, 2019

Places: 50

Language is a central aspect of how people construct and communicate identity. This course will review different approaches to the study of language and identity as they have been developed within sociolinguistics and related fields over the past 50 years. Questions that will be addressed include: what is identity and how do we operationalize it within sociolinguistic research? What linguistic practices are relevant for identity work? How do different types of identities and scales of experience interact in influencing linguistic behaviour? What is the relationship between individual agency and social background in conditioning observed patterns of language use? We will focus on some of the identity categories that have dominated work in sociolinguistics to date (e.g., social class, race, gender, sexuality, region), but also discuss social formations that have more recently been addressed in the literature (persona, stance). Methodologically, the course will draw on quantitative, qualitative and experimental approaches, including discussions of so-called “third wave” (i.e., social meaning) based studies of variation and research on sociolinguistic perception. By the end of the course, students will have a broad-based understanding of the different ways in which identity has been treated in the sociolinguistics literature, of the methodological options that exist for locating and examining identity in language, of the theoretical underpinnings of recent advances in identity-related research, and of how work on identity is relevant to other areas of sociolinguistic interest (e.g., research on language change). Students will be encouraged to draw on their own experience and interests to relate the topics discussed in the course to their own research.

Computational tools and the study of the Lexicon: resources to explore old and modern texts

Lecturer: Maria José B. Finatto

Starting Date: 02/05/2019
Ending Date: 04/05/2019

Places: 50

More and more, lexical studies have been conducting researches that are rather similar to the approaches that are supported by computers. Due to the central role of the lexicon, this approach tends to be useful for different types of studies on language, from the morphology of words to the semantics of the text. Nevertheless, little is known about the usefulness of basic tools (especially about the ones that are free) that allow users to explore collections of writing by digital means. This course will be taught in Portuguese.

School work with functional grammar (the one revealed in the texts)

Lecturer: Maria Helena Moura Neves

Starting Date: 02/05/2019
Ending Date: 04/05/2019

Places: 50

The course is driven by the notion that the investigation of the grammar of Portuguese can and must be centered on reflection about language in different usage situations, in different discourse genre and in different text types. The core guideline is to compose the lessons from the grammatical processes of constitution of the utterances activated in real texts.

Eye-Tracking in Psycholinguistics Research

Lecturer: Marcus Johnson

Starting Date: 02/05/2019
Ending Date: 04/05/2019

Places: 10

During the three day workshop on video based eye tracking and its application in psycholinguistic research, we will discuss the theoretical underpinnings of eye tracking methodology, how to optimize data quality in eye tracking studies, how to implement common psycholinguistic experimental paradigms, how to extract dependent measures for eye tracking studies, and how to synchronize/integrate eye trackers with other research devices.

The Paths of Literacy: from pre-literacy to critical and creative literacy, with emphasis on learning to read and write, including teaching methods

Lecturer: José Morais

Starting Date: 02/05/2019
Ending Date: 04/05/2019

Places: 50

In this course the following topics will be examined: (1) The concept of literacy as a type of empowerment (as it differs from the notion of literacy) and literacy levels; impact on cognition and the brain; (2) What is and how does the (neuro) cognitive science of literacy and, more specifically, the experimental psycholinguistics of literacy (examples of research); (3) The specific case of alphabetic literacy: alphabetical principle and spelling codes; (4) The final stage of acquisition of alphabetic literacy: characterization of reading and writing skills; (5) Previous factors influencing the learning process: sociocognitive, sociolinguistic and socio-affective variables; (6) Reading / comprehension skills and writing / writing skills; (7) Teaching methods; (8) Initial acquisitions: metaphonological skills and phonemic awareness; discrimination and identification of letters and graphemes; acquisition of the spelling code of the language; coding and decoding; fluency in reading and writing; (9) The passage of controlled and sequential read / write processes to non-conscious and automatic processes; (10) The difficulties of learning literacy, dyslexia, the need for its precise identification and specific follow-up; (11) Adult illiteracy and adult literacy; (12) Discussion on Brazil’s literacy situation and how to improve it. The course will be taught in Portuguese.

Programming elements for linguists: exploring, compiling, and annotating corpora with Python and NLTK

Lecturer: Leonel Figueiredo de Alencar

Starting Date: 02/05/2019
Ending Date: 04/05/2019

Places: 50

The advancement of information technology has made available an increasing amount of digital data for linguistic research. Several softwares with a graphical user interface facilitate the manipulation of this data by researchers without deep knowledge of computer science. However, the possibilities of using these tools are restricted to the options that were pre-defined by their creators. Learning to program allows one to overcome this limitation. It also contributes to improve several cognitive abilities, such as problem solving, logical reasoning, and so on. On the other hand, programming is a playful and self-expressive activity (ZELLE, 2004; BAILLY, 2008). In recent years, Python has consolidated itself as one of the favorite languages in the area of text processing, i.e., the manipulation and exploitation of electronic texts. Other advantages of Python are its ease of use and learning, its free and open source software nature as well as its vast community of programmers and users, who have made available free solutions for the most different tasks of natural language processing. This course will present Python programming and NLTK library basics for corpora exploration, compilation, and annotation. Unit I: Fundamentals of Python. This course will be taught in Portuguese.

Discourse, gender and language

Lecturer: Mónica Zoppi Fontana

Starting Date: 02/05/2019
Ending Date: 04/05/2019

Places: 50

The course aims to promote a theoretical and methodological discussion about the issues of gender, sex and sexuality, based on a discursive approach, focusing on the description of texts of diverse nature. The course presents the final results of the research project WOMEN IN SPEECH. PLACES OF ENGAGEMENT AND SUBJECTIVATION PROCESSES – CNPq (procees so 487140 / 2013-3) CNPq, coordinated by Mónica G. Zoppi Fontana at the State University of Campinas (UNICAMP). Discursive practices will be analyzed in their historical and ideological determinations, describing the processes by which senses and identifications of gender, sex and sexuality are produced, considered in their political dimension (discourses of oppression, discursive practices of resistance, emergence and legitimation of places of enunciation). This course will be taught in Portuguese.

Formal and Laboratory Phonology: Interfaces

Lecturers: José Magalhães, Ubiratã Alves

Starting Date: 02/05/2019
Ending Date: 04/05/2019

Places: 50

In the last decade, many studies have united experimental approaches to the explanations provided by Phonological Theory (COETZEE; KAGER; PATER; 2009). Departing from this scenario, a course that aims at an interaction between theoretical studies and experimental approaches in Phonology proves undoubtedly necessary. In this course, we intend to bridge the gap between formal and experimental phonology, by discussing how these two subfields of linguistic theory can be developed side by side. We also intend to address the main methodological challenges in studies on speech perception and production, as well as discuss how experimental data can be associated to formal phonological models. This course will be taught in Portuguese.

Coherence, reference and argumentation in Textual Linguistics

Lecturer: Mônica Magalhães Cavalcante

Starting Date: 02/05/2019
Ending Date: 04/05/2019

Places: 50

This course presupposes the close relationship between the construction of coherence and the mobilization of argumentative strategies, among which the use of referential processes and intertextual resources. Recognizing the theoretical relevance of coherence in a sociocognitive and discursive dimension, the topic organization and the argumentative orientation of a text, this course will be divided into three stages: in the first, it will articulate the meta-rules of coherence, the principles of centration and organicity and cohesive mechanisms; in the second, it will address the discursive perspective of the rhetorical argumentation adopted by Textual Linguistics; and, in the third, it will demonstrate the fundamental participation of the reference processes of argumentatively oriented development of coherence. This course will be taught in Portuguese.

The Theoretical-methodological Bases of Chomsky’s Linguistics

Lecturer: Maximiliano Guimarães

Starting Date: 02/05/2019
Ending Date: 04/05/2019

Places: 50

This course is based on my book The Foundations of Linguistic Theory of Chomsky (GUIMARÃES, M. 2017; editor Voices), particularly in chapters 2 and 5. The target audience covers linguists at all levels (from the beginning student to the experienced professional and active), aligned with any school or approach, accepting in equal conditions (i) ultra-critical and combative anti-Chomskyans, (ii) convinced Chomskyans and practitioners, and (iii) agnostics seeking to know the facts and the arguments that permeate the fierce debates about the conceptual and empirical framework of Chomskyan linguistics. For more than six decades, the Chomskyan conception of grammar has occupied a prominent place in the development of the great field of linguistic research as a whole. It is impossible to ignore the Chomskyan legacy, how you want us to stand in relation to it. True or wrong, Chomsky’s proposals are often original and daring, arousing irrational raptures of love or hatred before even being examined. Unfortunately, many of his followers and haters do not understand his work. Having read only random fragments or third party reviews, they perpetuate untruths, underestimating, overestimating or forging merits or demerits. Some fi-cam immediately fascinated and others immediately offended by the (heretical) proposal to investigate human language with the conceptual framework of the natural sciences, outside the epistemological jurisdiction of the humanities. One and the other immediately and uncritically accept or dismiss such an approach. They diffuse some ‘pirate version’ of it, without reproducing all the logical passages of argumentation, nor providing the key empirical data to defend or properly criticize the Chomskyan paradigm. This course (as well as the source book) intends to undo such confusions, guiding the student on his way towards knowledge of the subject, pointing out the origins, the goals, the traps, the shortcuts and the bridges. This course will not deal with the formal technical modeling apparatus (algebraic systems, derivations, rules and principles, tree representations or brackets), discussed in chapters 3 and 4 of the book. Classes will be mostly accessible to those who have only a basic knowledge of hierarchical structure of constituents and familiarity with the most elementary tree rules and diagrams from Bloomfieldian structuralism: typical content of introductory courses of syntax at undergraduate level. The course theme, in fact, is the theoretical-methodological basis of the Chomskyan paradigm that remains largely unchanged from its inception until today, surviving the many changes (major or minor) in the technical-analytical apparatus. The origin, logic and applications of basic concepts related to: (i) the treatment given to the empirical facts, the methods of collection and analysis, and the criteria for defining the grammaticality / acceptability status of each data ; (ii) the autonomy of syntax (in relation to semantics) and the legitimacy of the syntacococentric approach; (iii) the epistemological clipping and the definition of the object of study by taking grammar as a natural, not a social fact; (iv) the Chomskyan proposal for solving the tension between universal (invariant) and particular (variable) aspects that is posed for any and all linguistic theory; (v) the raison d’être and the role of the high degree of abstraction involved in theorizing, which the antagonists consider excessive, reductionist and unrealistic in the face of the multifactorial complexity of concrete speech acts; and (vi) the strong empirical evidence for the thesis of grammatical inertia and the apodictic character of the argumentative logic that sustains it (emphasizing that inatism is a conclusion, not a presupposition). The themes will be treated from a rescue of the primary bibliographic sources, from decades ago, tracing the historical course of ideas from the beginning until today. Some of the key criticisms of the Chomskyan paradigm will be taken into account, evaluating them in terms of empirical coverage and logical (in) consistency. This course will be taught in Portuguese.

Language production: a psycholinguistic approach to speech and writing

Lecturer: Érica dos Santos Rodrigues

Starting Date: 02/05/2019
Ending Date: 04/05/2019

Places: 50

The course presents some of the main research questions that have guided the work on language production in a psycholinguistic perspective. Based on the original Levelt (1989) and Bock & Levelt (1994) models, the stages of spoken language production are characterized, with emphasis on message conceptualization, grammatical encoding and speech monitoring. Considering data from speech errors and experimental results, we examine the factors that can generate interference in the language production processes (Goldrick, Ferreira & Miozzo, 2014; Rodrigues, 2015). The production of writing is also approached, seeking to specify the cognitive demands associated with the different moments of writing (Alamargot & Chanquoy, 2001; Beard et al. 2009). The use of tools that record keyboard events (keyloggers) is considered in terms of their investigative potential for the study of writing (Latif, 2008; Leijten & Van Waes, 2013). We discuss potential applications to health and education of the results of research on speech and writing. This course will be taught in Portuguese.

Multimodality and linguistics

Lecturer: Celia Magalhães

Starting Date: 02/05/2019
Ending Date: 04/05/2019

Places: 50

This course aims at approaching the interface of multimodality with the field of linguistics. Studies on multimodality focus on the contribution of language and other semiotic systems in the construal of meanings in several contexts of communication and representation. In linguistics, the description of meaning-making resources of language-image interaction in a number of genres (Martin, 1992; Martin & Rose, 2007, 2008) and texts has been a concern since the early nineties. Research work on multimodality in linguistics also focuses on the relevance of the construal of meaning at the intersection of meaning-making resources in educational contexts (Mccabe, O’Donnell, Whittaker, 2007 and others). It is emphasized that professionals from different areas such as applied linguistics, discourse analysis, and translation studies should participate collaboratively in the researching, theorizing and expanding the metalanguage of an evolving field. This course will address the contribution of image reading models based on systemic functional theory to studies on multimodality. It will also address intermodal translation – meaning construed at the intersection of verbiage (language) and image in a range of texts produced in different media. This course will be taught in Portuguese.

Introduction to Statistics for Linguists

Lecturer: Livia Oushiro

Starting Date: 02/05/2019
Ending Date: 04/05/2019

Places: 50

Linguists have increasingly become more aware of the need to deal with quantitative methods in data analysis. This course aims to introduce linguists to the practice of statistical analyses in R, a free platform that offers great flexibility in data analysis and in graphical and statistical computations. We will cover the basics of this programming language, as well as basic notions of descriptive and inferential statistics (tables, graphs, t-tests, chisquare tests, and correlation tests). Lessons consist of hands-on sessions of analyses of linguistic data. Participants should bring their own laptop computer and will be required to have previously downloaded and installed the course material, which will be sent prior to the course. This course will be taught in Portuguese.

Prosody in Expressive Speech: theoretical and methodological aspects

Lecturers: Plínio Barbosa, Sandra Madureira

Starting Date: May 02, 2019
Ending Date: May 04, 2019

Places: 50

The interest in the analysis of expressive speech becomes apparent in the rising number of research projects pursuing this kind of analysis in the international scenery of Speech Sciences mainly as a result of demands concerning the aplications to the fields of speech communication and man-machine interaction. The researchers, proponents of this course, have developed an original methodological approach to analyze speech expressivity based on theoretical and methodological foundations of Experimental Phonetics. This approach has been reported in their publications. The theoretical bases referred by the researchers concern motivated relations between sound and meaning and discuss them in terms of the codes underlying sound symbolism. The methodological approach includes scripts specially developed for the analysis of expressive speech data, analysis tools and methods which follow rigorous criteria in examining the acoustic characteristics of prosodic elements, in measuring acoustic parameters, in applying statistical tests and in performing production and perception experiments. The objective of this course is to investigate, by means of acoustic phonetic analysis and perceptual protocols, speech expressivity building processes and their impressive effects on the listeners. The correlations among acoustic, perceptual and meaning dimensions are taken into account in considering the links between sound and meaning in the expression of attitudes and emotions in several speech styles. Methodological aspects based on the research works carried out by the proponents are introduced. This course will be taught in Portuguese.

Early literacy to get competent readers and writers

Lecturer: Leonor Scliar-Cabral

Starting Date: 02/05/2019
Ending Date: 04/05/2019

Places: 50

This mini-course aims at a critical reflection on the foundations of early literacy for reading and writing, in the light of the most recent advances in neuroscience, linguistics, psycholinguistics, neuropsychology, altogether with the successful experiences which took place at Lagarto (SE) and José da Laje (AL) SEMEDS (Municipal Secretaries of Education). I highlight the discontinuities between the verbal oral language acquisition and the written systems, which are a cultural invention culminating with the alphabetical systems.

Translanguaging through the lens of language politics

Lecturer: Kanavillil Rajagopalan

Starting Date: 02/05/2019
Ending Date: 04/05/2019

Places: 50

The objective of the course is to shine a light on the phenomenon of translanguaging and its origins, relating it to the geopolitical reality that we currently live in and which has had an increasing impact on the whole issue. The issue will be approached from the perspective of language politics. An attempt will be made to examine its implications in the field of language teaching – be it the teaching of mother-tongue or of some foreign language. Depending on the availability of time and the disposition of the participants, specific situations in some countries of the continents of Africa and Asia will also be looked at, for the simple reasons that most of these countries have had to live with societal multilingualism and still bear testimony to Euro pean colonialism and its nefarious aftermath.

Introduction to the Studies on Language and Society

Lecturer: Anna Christina Bentes

Starting Date: 02/05/2019
Ending Date: 04/05/2019

Places: 50

The aim of the course is to explore the relations between language, text and society, based on the articulation of knowledge produced within different fields of study: sociolinguistics, sociology of language, anthropological linguistics, text and discourse studies and applied linguistics. For this, some important concepts that cross the theoretical and analytical perspectives of these fields will be presented, especially the concepts of language, variation, style, register, discourse genres and textuality. A more specific objective is to make students develop analytical skills that allow them to face the challenges inherent to a better understanding of the relations between language and society when considering and observing specific social and communicative practices. We should reflect on how the conception of language as social practice is a starting point for the analyzes and discussions to be developed throughout the course.

Information Structure: Syntactic and Semantic-Pragmatic Approache

Lecturer: Sérgio Menuzzi

Starting Date: 02/05/2019
Ending Date: 04/05/2019

Places: 50

The information structure of the sentence encodes the way the speaker believes his sentence contributes to the listener’s representation of the discourse context: what information is new, or old, the way old and new information relates to each other, etc. In order to analyze the organization of this aspect of the sentence, linguistic theory has developed notions such as “topic”, “focus”, “presupposition”, “contrast”. In this course, I will critically discuss recent theories of these notions, whether concerned with the way they are expressed syntactically and prosodically (Cruschina 2011, Büring 2016), or concerned with the proper semantic-pragmatic characterization of the notions of “topic”, “focus”, etc. (Rooth 1992, Schwarzchild 1999, Büring 2003, Büring 2016). I will argue that: (a) with respect to syntactic-prosodic encoding, there are reasons to simplify the relationship between syntax, prosody and informational categories, minimizing specialized functional structures; (b) as for the semantic-pragmatic characterization of informational categories, there is reason to believe that the basic ones are limited to topic/ground and focus/assertion articulations (Lambrecht 1994).

Documentation of sign languages

Lecturer: Jair Barbosa & Rodrigo Nogueira Machado

Starting Date: 02/05/2019
Ending Date: 04/05/2019

Places: 50

Objectives: – To discuss the importance of documenting the Pounds. – Analyze aspects about the vitality of Libras. – Discuss how to document the Pounds. – Analyze examples of analysis of Libras documentation. – Analyze ways of documenting Libras considering what, why and how to document. Contents: – Vitality of the Pounds. – Importance in documenting Libras – How to document Libras: Identify participants, organize data collection, implement filming, organize data archiving, organize metadata, transcribe data, publish data. – Ways to Document the Pounds: What? Because? As? – Presentation of previously documented data analyzes: variation data and Codas data. Procedures: – Lecture on the vitality of Libras and the importance of documenting this language. – Lecture on Libras documentation: how to document Libras. – Presentation of examples of documented data analysis. – Working groups: What to document? Because? For what? – Presentation of the works and discussion.